But they didn’t read me my Miranda rights!

But they didn’t read me my Miranda rights!

Well, the truth is, they don’t have to give you Miranda warnings.  The majority of people think that law enforcement officers are required to read Miranda warnings to a suspect at some point during the arrest procedure.  This is not the case.  Most simply stated, Miranda warnings are required only when two specific factors are present.  First, the suspect must be in police custody.  Second, the suspect must be subject to interrogation.  When these two factors are present, the accused must first be informed in clear and unequivocal language that he/she has the right to remain silent, that anything said can and will be used against him/her in court, that he/she has the right to consult with a lawyer and to have the lawyer present during interrogation, and that if he/she is indigent a lawyer will be appointed to represent them.  Failure by law enforcement to comply with the Miranda warnings when they are required should result in the evidence obtained during the interrogation being suppressed by the court.